Down Under

2016

Comedy

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 106,353 times
January 10, 2017 at 06:00 AM

Director

Cast

Damon Herriman as Jason
David Field as Vic
720p 1080p
640.61 MB
1280*720
English
NR
24 fps
1hr 30 min
P/S 18 / 160
1.33 GB
1920*1080
English
NR
24 fps
1hr 30 min
P/S 22 / 123

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by eddie_baggins 3 / 10

An important message gets lost in a misguided film

The 2005 Cronulla Race Riots marked down a dark time in Australian history where years' worth of racially infused tension boiled to a tipping point that saw vicious acts of violence and mob mentality take over the streets of Sydney and put the nation on a knifes edge.

Since then the country has been relatively quiet in comparison to this precariously placed moment but the day is still fresh in many people's minds and no doubt lays dormant in the ever growing city of Sydney, a city whose proud heritage of diverse cultures seems put a powder keg ready to explode at any given moment.

Looking to maximise this event for a feature film that mixes uneasy comedy with wannabe social commentary, director Abe Forsythe alongside his producing partner Greg Mclean (the Wolf Creek helmer whose horror debut gets a run here in the film) focus on the day after the race riots in which equally rag-tag groups of Ned Kelly loving locals and Muslim/Australians go out on patrol looking to enact revenge on any possible minorities that may just show their face on the streets.

Down Under's premise is an intriguing one but Forsythe struggles to find the right status quo as his film's comedy feels forced and rather tired and outdated, yeah we get it, some ethnicities enjoy a good burnout more than others or a nice chicken kebab, whilst the films messages are blurred around some rather amateurish direction and a bunch of characters that all feel like caricatures rather than living breathing inhabitants of this time and place.

A key for a film of this ilk, with a large array of comical and larger than life creations, like a stoner Blockbuster video clerk, a constantly rapping Muslim or in perhaps the films strangest scene an eyeliner wearing drug dealer, is to make the smallest character through to the most prominent interesting and likable, the Coen Brothers do this incredibly well, but Forsythe, Mclean and the ensembles actors struggle to make the material work.

Filled with potential and promise, Down Under is a frustrating piece of work on a topic that deserves to be delved into more and while it's great to see a local filmmaker have a decent crack at shining a light on the real Australia, this uneven experience works neither as important social commentary or a comedy and a particularly misguided finale ruins any chance the film had to end with a bang.

1 ½ Blockbuster stores out of 5

Reviewed by mkparker-53380 10 / 10

best black comedy I've seen in a while!

To see this film rated at 6.1 is complete crap, it definitely does not deserve anything less than an 8. After reading a couple bad reviews, it looks like some of you idiots went expecting something closer to real events, but if you just look at it just as what it is, a hilarious black comedy, its amazing! I laughed my ass off the entire film, the acting was perfect, the story really was interesting for a comedy, and every second of the film was incredibly entertaining! I really thought it was damn near perfect for a black comedy, some of you people need to realize that this is not documentation, nor a true story, its a comedy, a really funny one!

Reviewed by CineMuseFilms 4 / 10

A comically lame quagmire of vilification and gratuitous violence.

To call Down Under (2016) a black comedy signals an intention to make light of something serious or controversial. But movie labels are all too often disguised marketing spin rather than accurate genre descriptions. Far from comedy, this film is a dystopian parody of an episode of Australian history that needs balanced understanding and nuance rather than exaggerated ridicule. It could have applied humour to lighten the portraits of racial bigotry but instead it creates a quagmire of gratuitous violence and comically lame racial, sexual and impairment vilification.

The opening scenes is the only time Down Under speaks with honesty and authenticity. Using archival footage of the 2005 Cronulla race riots overlaid with Christmas jingles, the stage is set for a clash of cultures that was seen around the world. The riots resulted from years of escalating tension between white locals who claimed 'ownership' of beautiful Cronulla beach and Lebanese groups from neighbouring suburbs wanting to share beach access. From this factual base, the film weaves a fictionalised account of two gangs of young men on opposing sides of the racial divide. With testosterone-fuelled honour at stake, the gangs escalate their violent rantings towards each other and cruise the streets hunting for supremacy. Along the way, they vilify everything and everyone so indiscriminately that are caricatures of aimless anger that bear no resemblance to real people. They are portrayed mostly as working class morons and hotheads whose constant screaming, swearing and physical abuse forms an endless spray of vitriol that makes this film an overcooked mess.

Down Under is a film that appears to have lost sight of its own purpose. If it was made to create humour out of violence then one-line clichés do little more than demonise stereotypes. If it was to offer insight into the cause of the riots then its fictional exaggerations undermine its credibility. If it was to portray the racist undercurrent of Australian culture then the absence of Indigenous people leaves it staring only at its own stereotypes. A wide chasm exists between the film's inspiration and execution, and whatever messages were intended are obscured by pushing creative limits into the realm of the absurd. The film leads towards an incoherent and implausible finale that fuses slapstick and violence without redemptive merit. It is disappointing to see such a lost opportunity to inform or entertain. The film's closing credits were a welcome sight.

Read more IMDb reviews

14 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment